Category Archives: File-Sharing

News in the controversial world of file-sharing

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Private BitTorrent Site BTTrove Announces Shutdown

By Drew Wilson

Private BitTorrent site BTTrove, an e-learning torrent site, has announced that they will be shutting down operations. Members who use the site describe the announcement as sudden and sad.

The announcement was sent out to members on Tuesday. Site staff cited a handful of issues with keeping the site open, but the shut down of the site’s PayPal account was described as the tipping point for the impending closure. Here’s the announcement members received:

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South Korea Three Strikes Law Under Re-Examination Pressure

By Drew Wilson

The three strikes law concept has been falling on hard times in these last few months. The only country we haven’t heard about much that has implemented a three strikes law is South Korea. Now we have. Apparently, the laws have resulted in numerous takedown requests, multiple suspensions and little in the way of results when it comes to stopping piracy. Human rights organizations are calling on the government to re-examine the laws due to, in part, possible violations of human rights.

Hailed as the be-all, end-all solution to stopping Internet piracy, rightsholders from major multinational corporations have been trying to push the three strikes law in multiple countries over the last few years. A few countries caved from the the lobbying pressure and implemented such laws to keep the foreign corporations happy. It seemed that implementation meant that the laws were successful for these rightsholders as they pressured other countries to follow suit because of this new “international standard” for stopping piracy. Yet, what were the results of these laws? Did it slow down piracy in the end? Are music sales exploding on the charts? Unfortunately, it seems that everywhere such a law or policy was implemented, failure ensued.

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Time Warner Cable Hacked for Six Strike Participation

By Drew Wilson

The Copyright Alert System rolled out last week and the system has a lot to be desired in terms of protecting the users security (among other things). Many are unhappy about it and, recently, one group hacked an ISP over it.

Time Warner Cable’s support website was defaced last week. The defacement was carried out by a group calling themselves “Nullcrew”. From Web Pro News:

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US Six Strike Policy – A Security Disaster for Users?

By Drew Wilson

Last week, we pointed to a report that the US Copyright Alert System was beginning to roll out this week. Now that it has, we’ve seen how alerts will be sent to users and it’s far worse than we originally thought.

Ars Technica able to obtain screenshots of what an alert looks like for Comcast users. What we originally thought was that the alerts would be sent via e-mail to the subscribers. We thought this because that was how DMCA notices are sent out. Instead, they will be injected into the users web browser session and shown when the user receives a strike. An excerpt from Ars Technica:

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RIANZ Spends $250,000 on Three Strikes Law to Reap $616.57

By Drew Wilson

The Recording Industry Association of New Zealand (RIANZ) finally convicted its first file-sharer under the now tested New Zealand three strikes law. While RIANZ may be feeling satisfied it got a result, the money spent may raise some questions over the effectiveness of such a law.

We’ve been covering the developments of the New Zealand three strikes law for close to a month now. When we reported on the first conviction, one of the things we discussed is the possible similarities between the Skynet law and HADOPI – particularly how the balance sheet didn’t look pretty for HADOPI. Now, today, New Zealand media is reporting on exactly this topic. Apparently, in order to get to this point in time, RIANZ spent a quarter of a million dollars to send out copyright violation notices. Since RIANZ has only gotten one conviction, the rewards for spending that money came to a grand total of $616.57 in fines.

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RIANZ – Downloading P2P Software Proof of Wrongdoing

By Drew Wilson

The day after New Zealand saw its first conviction under the so-called “three strikes law”, the Recording Industry Association of New Zealand (RIANZ) went on the airwaves to discuss the development. Managing director Chris Caddick said in a radio interview that the very act of downloading a file-sharing program in an and of itself is proof of wrongdoing.

We’ve been closely monitoring the situation in New Zealand where the three strikes law, sometimes referred to as the Skynet law, is making headlines. Earlier this month, Freezenet was one of the first this year to report on the developments that the first file-sharer would be convicted under the law that was financed and lobbied for by the United States.

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New Wave of Canadian FileSharing Lawsuits Hits Roadblock

By Drew Wilson

Late last year, Canadians were treated to news that an anti-piracy outfit working on behalf of Voltage media was gearing up to sue Canadians by the millions for the downloading of copyrighted movies on BitTorrent. While those operating on the side of the plaintiffs of the case practically insinuated that going through the courts was merely a formality and that the jig was up and a million users will be hearing from lawyers about possible litigation, that formality turned out to be an increasingly large roadblock in the path to mass litigation.

When news spread that there was the possibility of a mass flood of litigation against alleged copyright infringers over the Internet, some took the anti-piracy efforts comments to their word. “Canada prepares for crackdown on BitTorrent movie pirates” wrote Global News. “Things are looking a little scary for Canadian BitTorrent users” wrote wrote ZeroPaid. “Will Canadians feel compelled to pay? We may soon find out.” wrote TorrentFreak. With comments like that, it would be no surprise that some would think that a massive litigation campaign was going to happen tomorrow and that the courts have already had their say in the matter. Not so – at least, a flood of lawsuits will not happen tomorrow and the courts aren’t done hearing arguments in the original TekSavvy case – the case that sparked the fears in the first place.

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